Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Birds of North Carolina

The thing I noted first upon our arrival to our new home was the number and diversity of trees here.
  In our South Florida home, the tree of the day was definitively the pine.  Not so, our new home, so it is little wonder in the abundance of so many glorious trees that more than a few birds make this area either their permanent home or a stop off on their sometimes very long journey.

One of the hands down favorites, the Eastern Bluebird is spotted frequently by golfers as they play, on cemetery properties or fields. Beloved, not only for its beauty but its readily identifiable and truly lovely song. They will begin nesting in our area in early spring.  Many cultivate their attendance providing some form of peanut butter mix or raisins softened by soaking.  On their own they seek their favorite food of meal worms. 

Every gardener I know seeks to cultivate visits by the Ruby-throated hummingbird.  In our inns garden we provide Honeysuckle vines, phlox, columbine and bee balm-All favorites  for this consistently hungry little bird with an enviable metabolism. Contributing to this metabolism is the rapid wing motion, darting movements and twice yearly visits to Mexico in its migratory pattern. Our state is a nesting ground before this bird migrates south.  Watch very carefully because this little avian is so fast that one could question whether they actually spotted it. 

Faithful is the Purple Martin who nests each year in North Carolina after leaving South America. So welcome are they in this area that custom made houses and gourds are constructed to welcome this frequent visitor. Scouts of this species sent to locate their nesting homes are first seen here end February- middle March time frame.  Wintering in South America, they make their way north as the indigenous insect populations upon which they feed, proliferate.
One of the largest of the swallows, this dark purple/blue colored bird hallmarks that summer is not too far ahead.


Patti and Gary Wiles, Innkeepers

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